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South Australia is huge & not surprisingly this poses problems providing a response to serious trauma in the country. Thankfully rural doctors are mostly well-trained and thrive on the challenge of delivering excellent emergency care in their local hospitals…and if needed, can call upon the retrieval service to transfer critically unwell patients. The Statewide retrieval …

Reductio ad absurdum

Recent discussions with fellow rural doctors in South Australia have left me somewhat depressed.I reckon that being a rural doctor is one of, if not the best job in medicine. You really get to enjoy all the ‘best bits’ of medicine, with a diverse workload that is continually challenging. Its also a great lifestyle (I …

Gear fetish

I’m in love…with my KingVision videolaryngoscope. It’s somewhat of a generalism, but anaesthetists tend to be ‘propellor heads’ – they like to fiddle with equipment, & they are invariably seduced by things technical…you can usually tell anaesthetic doctors at a conference – they’re the ones with MacBook Pros or iPads or iPhones. But I digress. …

Networking and Silos

Well, just got back from the excellent GP Anaesthetists conference held in Sydney under the auspices of the NSW Rural Doctors Network. Apparently it’s an event they hold every other year (alternating with an obstetric workshop) and manage to do each workshop twice in each year – delivering quality education to approx 80 of the …

Keeping it Simple

One of the enjoyable challenges of rural & remote medicine is delivering high-quality care within the constraints of a health system that is cash-strapped, and where rural doctors often work between private clinic (own business) and public (State-run hospital) domains.Sadly there exists a health-gap between rural and metropolitan Australians. For many services, health outcomes are …